How to select a martial arts training organization that suits your needs.


When choosing a club the culture counts.

With so many clubs out there teaching who knows what how do you choose which one is right for you?  The answer is simple.  Visit several.  There are many effective training systems available in the United States today.  Some are entrenched systems that have roots that go back hundreds of years.  Some are recent amalgamations of various arts.  Some are purely fads that will be gone after a short time.  It frequently isn't so much a question of style as many systems have valid answers to the same questions (often-times the same answers).  Rather it is a question of culture.  The culture of Kingstowne Family Martial Arts is one of mutual respect and courtesy.  We train correctly.  We train courteously.  We train hard.  If this sounds like what you're interested in then call us today to schedule a free guest class!


Don't let titles or belts fool you.

Walking into some martial arts clubs can be like walking into a shrine.  The master's picture is plastered everywhere with a caption that reads "grand exalted supreme master" - and his students are expected to refer to him as such.  That guy puts his pants on one leg at a time just like you.  He walked into a martial arts club for the first time once just like you did.  He stumbled over his own feet and couldn't remember how to hold his hands up just like you.  He gets to call the shots because he's already made all of the mistakes that you are going to make . . . Hopefully he learned from them!


Accreditation Counts.

When you send your children to school or enroll yourself in a college course you trust that the school (be it private or public) has hired qualified instructors.  Why would you expect any different for your martial arts study?  The conundrum is determining which "governing bodies" are genuine and which are merely marketting agencies.  Usually a little research on the internet can help clear things up.  KFMA is a member of the USA National Karate Federation and Kuniba-Kai International.


Find out about fees.

When visiting clubs, don't plan on signing up right away.  Tuition is important, but it's not the only cost concern.  Ask about annual fees, equipment costs, testing fees, and any additional costs that might exist.  Not infrequently clubs will lure prospective students with promises of cheap tuition then, once they have signed the papers, will hit them with expensive fees and equipment requirements. 

That said, don't base your assessment of the program on the cost of the program alone.  Both good and poor programs can be very cheap, very expensive or anywhere in between.